Learn these 3 reasons why some gardeners have to dig up and store their bulbs during the winter on this quick DIY Garden Minute podcast.

If you want to learn more about winter pruning, register now for our winter pruning do’s and don’ts webinar and find out what plants can be cut back this winter! Go to www.spokengarden.com/winterpruningwebinar to register now!

 

 

 

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hands holding tulip bulbs outside.

Today’s Topic: 

3 Reasons Why Some Gardeners Have to Dig Up and Store Bulbs For Winter.

In this podcast, you’ll learn why some gardeners living in certain areas and under certain conditions need to store their bulbs over the winter months.

What You’ll Learn:

  • 3 reasons some gardeners need to store their bulbs.
  • How hardy certain popular bulbs are by comparing to your lowest average temperature.
  • Resources and links for more information.

Resources:

Some of the resources and products below may be affiliate links, meaning we might get paid a commission (at no extra cost to you) if you use that link to make a purchase.

3 Reasons Some Gardeners Have to Dig Up Bulbs For Winter

If you have flowering bulbs in your garden, then you need to know if you can leave them in the ground or should you dig them up to store over the winter months.

In general, you can leave your flowering bulbs in the ground if

  1. They are cold-hardy in your climate, 

  2. They are tolerant or resistant to wet conditions (well-draining soil helps too), and

  3. They are tolerant or resistant to your local pests. 

 

An few examples of bulbs we can keep in the ground during winter months in our USDA hardiness zone of 8b are

  • Daffodils
  • Tulips
  • Dahlias
  • Gladiolus
  • Crocosmia, along with many others.

 

If any of your bulbs aren’t cold-hardy where you live, or are not resistant or tolerant of wet conditions and local pests over the winter months, then you will need to dig them up and storing them to then be replanted in your garden next spring.

 

How Hardy are Certain Bulbs?

To find out if certain bulbs are hardy to your area, compare the listed bulbs below and their “hardy to” (winter-hardy) in:

  • Daffodils are hardy to Zones 3 to 8 (-30F/ -34C)
  • Tulips are hardy to Zones 3 to 8 (11 to 0F/ -12 to -18C)
  • Muscari are hardy to Zones 3 to 9 (-10 to -20F/ -23 to -29C)
  • Gladioli (certain species, check each cultivar) are hardy to Zones 7 to 10 (15F / -9C)
  • Dahlias are hardy to Zones 8 to 10 (20F / -7C)
  • Crocosmia are hardy to Zones 6 to 9 (10 to -5F/ -12 to -21C)
  • Crocus are hardy to Zones 3 to 8 (11 to 0F/ -12 to -18C)
  • Snowdrops are hardy to Zones 3 to 8 (-40F / -40C)
  • Alliums have hardiness that is species dependent.

 

 

 

Again, if you want to learn more about winter pruning, register now for our winter pruning do’s and don’ts webinar and find out what plants can be cut back this winter! Go to www.spokengarden.com/winterpruningwebinar to register now! 

 

 

If you aren’t sure where to start learning about garden care, go to our Start Here page at spokengarden.com/start-here . And, if you have questions about these or other plants, we are here to help, so please email us.

 

Thanks for Listening!!!

That’s all for this podcast episode! You can find other beginning gardener topics on our podcast page by clicking here or go to SpokenGarden.com and click on the “Listen” tab. Also find us on your favorite podcast platform and smart speaker!

 

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If you want to know more about growing plants and flowers, check out our new book The First-Time Gardener: Growing Plants and Flowers: All the Know-how you need to plant and tend outdoor areas using eco-friendly methods.

You can pre-order now so you get your copy on our release date of February 9th, 2021.

 

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Learn these 3 reasons why some gardeners have to dig up and store their bulbs during the winter on this quick DIY Garden Minute podcast.